Bike Park Season is Upon Us

Summer is Here

If you are a gravity-focused rider, opening day of your local bike park is like Christmas morning. The 6 month or longer wait is finally over and you can't wait to rip some laps with your friends. This year, opening day is extra special. As the chair lifts start spinning, many other aspects of the world are slowly starting to re-open. Riding the bike park is a glimpse of normality which we all crave after several months of Coronavirus lockdown. Since it's been awhile since you last rode in the park, we wanted to give you some tips on how you can make yourself and your bike more prepared for long days of descending.

 

Bike Park Guide Sections

GET YOURSELF READY  |  GET YOUR BIKE READY  |  GET YOUR BIKE TO THE CHAIRLIFT  |  KEEP YOUR BIKE DIALED

GET YOURSELF READY

Update your Riding Kit and Protection Equipment

Riding a bike park is typically more dangerous than riding your local trails. Bike park trails are steeper, rockier, and looser than what you experience at home. These gnarly features which make the trails more fun, also make them more difficult. In recent years, the amount of protection that mountain bikers wear seems to have dropped as many of us ride up the hill to earn our descent. Wearing a full-face helmet on a trail ride is uncomfortable and usually very hot, so it makes since that open-face helmets have gained popularity. When you are using a chairlift to get to the top of the mountain though, there is really no reason to not wear your most protective gear.

PROTECTION

Your helmet is and always will be the most important piece of protective equipment that you wear. Even when riding on a mellow trail without pads on, it’s still crucial that you wear a helmet. At a bike park, the difficultly of riding is increased so it's a good idea to improve your protection gear as well. I highly recommend that anyone riding in a bike park wear a full-face helmet. Full face helmets may be heavier and hotter than standard helmets, but the increased protection they provide is well worth the trade-off. Many companies are also creating a new wave of lightweight highly-ventilated Enduro full-face helmets. These helmets share many of the same safety certifications as a full-face helmet, but weigh significantly less. To finish it off, select a nice pair of tinted goggles to protect your eyes from all the dust and sun.

SHOP FULL-FACE HELMETS

SHOP GOGGLES

SHOP PROTECTIVE GEAR

RIDING KIT

You may want to upgrade your riding kit before you hit the bike park. A new jersey and pants will not only make you look fresh, but they might improve your protection aswell. In the world of bike parks, long sleeve jerseys and knee pads are your friend. It may be hot, but long sleeves keep the sun off and provide better protection when you crash. Gloves are also key, gloves keep your hands glued to the grips when you become sweaty, and again, provide better protection in case of a crash. Another great item to have with you is a hydration pack. The pack has space to store spare tubes and tools you want to bring on the mountain, but also provides you with constant water while you are riding. Just because you are not pedaling to the top of the mountain, doesn’t mean that you don’t need to drink lots of water.

SHOP JERSEYS

SHOP GLOVES

SHOP SHORTS

SHOP HYDRATION PACKS

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GET YOUR BIKE READY

Upgrade your bike to handle the park

Your bike can take quite a beating at a bike park. Compared to your local trails at home, bike park trails typically feature rockier terrain and loose dirt. Combine this gnarly terrain with the constant descending that a chairlift provides, your bike rarely leaves the bike park in as good of shape as it arrives. Now most of us don’t have a downhill bike dedicated to bike park riding in the summer, so we take our everyday mountain bike to the park instead. Luckily for us, modern mountain bikes are built quite tough, but there are still multiple add-ons and upgrades you can buy for you bike to help it survive the carnage the bike park ensues.

ADDITIONS

There are many items you can add to your bike to make it more suitable for the park. Two easy upgrades include frame protection and a fork fender. The fender prevents small rocks tossed up by your front wheel from hitting your frame. The frame protection protects your frame from the loose rocks that still make it to your frame. The Protection also helps save your frame from damage in the event of a crash. Another great upgrade for park riding are tire inserts. In order to achieve proper traction mountain bikers run low tire pressure. This low tire pressure makes it easy to dent your rims when you ride over extra rocky terrain. A tire insert protects your rims from dents while running low tire pressure. The inserts also provide additional vibration dampening which creates an overall smoother ride.

SHOP TIRE INSERTS

SHOP BIKE PROTECTION

SHOP BIKE FENDERS

UPGRADES

There are several key upgrades that will help your bike survive a long day at the park. To start with, nothing provides you with proper control like a powerful set of brakes. If your current brakes aren’t incredible, it might be a good idea to upgrade them before shredding the park. Ideally you want a 4-piston brake. A four piston brake provides more powerful braking performance than a 2-piston brake. Another great upgrade are thicker tires. By thickness, I’m referring to the sidewall thickness. Tires with downhill rated sidewalls won’t get destroyed by sharp rocks at the bike park. A final upgrade you could consider is a longer dropper post. If you run a dropper post and still have some room to spare, running a longer post will allow your saddle to get further out of the way giving you more control and confidence on steep trails.

SHOP MOUNTAIN BRAKES

SHOP MOUNTAIN TIRES

SHOP DROPPER POSTS

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GET YOUR BIKE TO THE CHAIRLIFT

TRANSPORT YOUR BIKE TO THE MOUNTAIN

Most bike parks are located up in the mountains away from mass civilization. There geographic isolation provides us with an escape from city life, but that isolation also usually requires a couple hour drive. If you’ve ever tried to fit a bike within the passenger area of a car, you know its quite difficult and frustrating. Installing an bike rack or tailgate pad to your vehicle is a much easier and safer way to transport your bike to the bike park. Also, it’s much easier to bring your riding friends when you have a multiple-bike rack or pad installed. There are multiple types of racks and pads you can use depending on which type of vehicle you have.

TAILGATE PADS AND TRUCK BED RACKS

The easiest way to transport your bike using a truck is with a tailgate pad. A tailgate pad installs easily and protects your tailgate from getting scratched by your bike. Tailgate pads are also a great way to transport multiple bikes. You can typically fit up to 6 bikes on a tailgate pad if you need to. If you rather not hang your bikes off the end of your truck, you can also look at in-bed mounted racks. These small racks mount directly into your truck bed and hold your bike in place like a traditional bike rack.

SHOP TAILGATE PADS AND TRUCK BED RACKS

ROOF RACKS AND HITCH RACKS

Depending on which type of car you have, you may need a hitch rack or a roof rack. Many people favor hitch racks for a couple reasons. A hitch rack is better for your vehicles fuel economy and it stays safely tucked behind the profile of your vehicle. Roof racks are great for cars that don’t have a hitch rack, but bikes on the roof create more drag and you have to be careful to not drive under any low bridges. When it comes down to a bridge vs. a bike, the bridge always wins. Besides clearance issues, a roof racks is a great way to transport your bike.

SHOP AUTO RACKS

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KEEP YOUR BIKE DIALED

GET YOUR BIKE READY FOR THE NEXT TRIP TO THE PARK

Once your day at the bike park is over, it’s important to check over your bike to make sure everything is still in proper mechanical order. After consecutive hours of rough riding, it’s time to make sure all your bolts are tight and wheels are straight before your next ride. There are also certain spare parts and tools you should bring to the bike park in case anything happens mid-day. It’s always a bummer to call the day early because of a mechanical issue. Finally, once you get home, it’s a good idea to give your bike a proper cleaning. A clean bike is a happy bike. A bike that is degreased and lubed up properly will last longer and perform better.

WHAT TO BRING ON THE TRIP

It’s a good idea to bring certain spare parts to the bike park that tend to wear down from extensive use. To start with, always bring some spare tubes and the tools required to change a flat tire. A floor pump is the easiest way to inflate a tube, but hand pumps and CO2 cannisters get the job done as well. Regardless if you run tubeless or already run tubes, having a spare tube is crucial to keep your bike rolling till the last lift. Other components that can give out mid-day include tires, brake pads, derailleur hangers, and chains. If one of your tires gets slashed by a rock, a spare tire will save the day, even if it’s old and worn out.  If your brake pads wear down to the metal while riding, it’s important to replace them to avoid damaging your disc rotor and brake caliber. It’s also a good idea to have an extra derailleur hanger incase the one on your bike breaks or bends. Finally, a snapped chain isn’t too common of an occurrence, but if it does happen, a spare master-link will keep the ride alive.

SHOP PUMPS AND CO2 KITS

SHOP BRAKE PADS

SHOP DERAILLEUR HANGERS

SHOP MASTER LINKS

WHAT TO USE BACK AT HOME

When it comes down to cleaning your bike, degreasers and cleaners are both equally important. The degreaser will dissolve the dirty, gritty grease off of your components and the cleaners will restore those components to like-new condition. Cleaning brushes can make this process much easier. If you want to take your cleaning to the next level, also purchase a chain cleaner. Consistently using a chain cleaner extends both the life of your chain and your drivetrain. The next step is re-applying lubricants and grease to the appropriate areas. Make sure to not spill any lube of grease on your brake rotors or brake pads. Doing so will contaminate your brakes, diminishing their braking performance.

SHOP CLEANERS AND DEGREASERS

SHOP LUBRICANTS AND GREASE